Democracy Now

Democracy Now!
A daily TV/radio news program, hosted by Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez, airing on over 1,100 stations, pioneering the largest community media collaboration in the United States.
Updated: 8 hours 52 min ago

Vijay Prashad: 2011 NATO Bombing of Libya Led to Rise of Militias Now Fighting for Oil-Rich Land

Tue 07 40 AM

Libya is experiencing its most intense fighting since the 2011 NATO-backed campaign to remove Muammar Gaddafi. On Monday, the Libyan Parliament that was replaced in an election in June reconvened and chose an Islamist-backed deputy as the new prime minister. This now leaves Libya with two rival leaders and assemblies, each backed by armed factions. Meanwhile, The New York Times has revealed Egypt and the United Arab Emirates launched airstrikes twice in the last week against Islamist-allied militias battling for control of Tripoli. Despite the strikes, the Islamist militants managed to solidify control of the capital of Tripoli by taking over the main airport. "[The U.S. and NATO] bombed the country and opened the door for the different militias to now compete against each other," says Vijay Prashad, professor of international studies at Trinity College. "So the day Gaddafi was killed, from then onwards, the militias have basically been at each other’s throats."

There's Something Wrong in America: Michael Brown's Funeral Sparks Calls for an Enduring Movement

Tue 07 26 AM

More than 2,500 people filled the sanctuary of Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church in St. Louis for Michael Brown’s funeral. Another 2,000 packed into overflow rooms. Speakers included Rev. Al Sharpton, attorney Benjamin Crump and Brown’s cousin, Ty Pruitt. "America is going to have to come to terms with, there’s something wrong that we have money to give military equipment to police forces, but we don’t have money for training and money for public education and money to train our children," Sharpton said.

"There Will Be Justice": Mourners Speak Outside Michael Brown's Funeral in St. Louis

Tue 07 13 AM

Thousands of people lined up to pay their respects at Michael Brown’s funeral on Monday in St. Louis, Missouri. The killing of the 18-year-old African American by a white police officer in Ferguson has sparked weeks of protest and conversations about race, both around the country and in the local community. Democracy Now!’s Aaron Maté was in St. Louis and spoke with mourners as they filed into the Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church. "I know about Martin Luther King, I know about Emmett Till, but I am actually living something that should have stopped years and years ago," says local resident Anne Hamilton. "We just want, as African Americans, to be treated fairly and to be given the same advantages." St. Louis resident Elwood Harris responds to the protests, which have at times involved looting. "What else can we do? We took the Martin Luther King approach, protesting and peace, but there is no peace, and there is no justice," Harris says. "But there will be justice in this case, I really do believe."

Hip-Hop Voices Talib Kweli & Rosa Clemente in Ferguson, "Ground Zero" for Police Brutality Struggle

Mon 07 46 AM

Mourners are gathering in St. Louis today for the funeral of Michael Brown, the unarmed African-American teenager killed by a white police officer on August 9. His father, Michael Brown Sr., has requested a day of silence and peace after two weeks of nightly protests in Ferguson over the police killing of his 18-year-old son. We turn now to two well-known voices from the hip-hop community who have joined the protests in Ferguson. Talib Kweli is a world renowned hip-hop artist. Rosa Clemente is a longtime activist and former director of the Hip Hop Caucus. In 2008, she was the Green Party’s vice-presidential nominee. "The fact that he’s someone who could be my son, fact that he’s someone who could be me," Kweli said, "fact that he’s someone who I relate to on a lot of levels, being a black man and my experience in America, it just really touched me in a way that the news stories couldn’t capture."

"I Can't Breathe": NYC March over Chokehold Death of Eric Garner Protests Police Violence Nationwide

Mon 07 32 AM

On Saturday, thousands marched in Staten Island, New York, to protest the death of Eric Garner, who died on July 17 after police placed him in a chokehold and then pinned him to the ground. At the march, demonstrators chanted "I can’t breathe!" referring to the 11 times Eric Garner said that as he was held down by New York City Police Department officers. Many have called for the officers in the case to be brought to justice. The death of the 43-year-old African-American father of six has sparked a larger national debate about the NYPD’s use of excessive force and its policy of cracking down on low-level offenses. It also comes as demonstrations have erupted nationwide over other police killings of unarmed men. The protesters in Staten Island chanted "Hands up, don’t shoot!" in solidarity with the people of Ferguson, Missouri, who are protesting the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown. "We need to show the community that these police officers need to be disciplined and they need to be sentenced, for all that they caused," says 12-year-old Imani Morrias. "They caused so much pain."

Blowback: Vijay Prashad on How Islamic State Grew Out of U.S Invasion of Iraq, Destruction of Nation

Mon 07 08 AM

Militants from Islamic State stormed an air base in northeast Syria on Sunday, capturing it from government forces. Fighters from Islamic State have seized three Syrian military bases in the area in recent weeks. This comes as the Pentagon considers expanding its airstrikes against Islamic State in Iraq to include targets inside Syria. Meanwhile, another journalist who had been kidnapped in Syria, Peter Theo Curtis, has been freed after two years in captivity by the Nusra Front — another militant group in Syria. Calls have been growing for the United States to attack Syria since Islamic State posted video showing the kidnapped American journalist James Foley being beheaded. Foley was captured in Syria in 2012. Meanwhile in Iraq, officials say suicide bomber targeted a Shiite mosque in Baghdad today, killing at least 12 people. We speak to Vijay Prashad, professor of international studies at Trinity College. He is the author of several books, including "Arab Spring, Libyan Winter" and, most recently, "The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South."

Dr. Paul Farmer on African Ebola Outbreak: Growing Inequality in Global Healthcare at Root of Crisis

Fri 07 13 AM

As the death toll from the West African Ebola outbreak nears 1,400, two American missionaries who received experimental drugs and top-notch healthcare have been released from the hospital. We spend the hour with Partners in Health co-founder Dr. Paul Farmer discussing what can be done to stop the epidemic and the need to build local healthcare capacity, not just an emergency response. "The Ebola outbreak, which is the largest in history that we know about, is merely a reflection of the public health crisis in Africa, and it’s about the lack of staff, stuff and systems that could protect populations, particularly those living in poverty, from outbreaks like this or other public health threats," says Farmer, who has devoted his life to improving the health of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people. He is a professor at Harvard Medical School and currently serves as the special adviser to the United Nations on community-based medicine. He has written several books including, "Infections and Inequalities: The Modern Plagues."

A War on Gaza's Future? Israeli Assault Leaves 500 Kids Dead, 3,000 Injured, 373,000 Traumatized

Thu 07 37 AM

As the Israeli offensive in Gaza resumes, we look at the impact the military campaign has had on the children of Gaza. More than 467 Palestinian children have died since July. That is more than the combined number of child fatalities in the two previous conflicts in Gaza. According to the World Health Organization, more than 3,000 children have been injured, of which an estimated 1,000 will suffer from a lifelong disability. The United Nations estimates at least 373,000 children require direct and specialized psychosocial support. And, based on the total number of adults killed, there may be up to 1,500 children orphaned. Gazan children’s right to an education has also been severely compromised with at least 25 schools reportedly damaged so severely that they can no longer be used. We speak to Pernille Ironside, chief of UNICEF’s Gaza field office.

"There isn’t a single family in Gaza who hasn’t experienced personally death, injury, the loss of their home, extensive damage, displacement," Ironside says. "The psychological toll that has on a people, it just cannot be overestimated, and especially on children."

"Negro Spring": Ferguson Residents, Friends of Michael Brown Speak Out for Human Rights

Thu 07 14 AM

As peaceful protests continued Wednesday in Ferguson, Missouri, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder arrived in the city to meet with residents and FBI agents investigating the police shooting of Michael Brown. Democracy Now! traveled to Ferguson this week and visited the site where the 18-year-old Brown was killed. We spoke to young people who live nearby, including some who knew him personally. "He fell on his knees. Like, ’Don’t shoot.’ [The police officer] shot him anyway in the eye, the head, and four times down here," said one local resident Rico Like. "Hands up, don’t shoot is all I got to say. RIP Mike Brown."

Stop the Violence from Ferguson to Gaza: 90-Year-Old Holocaust Survivor Arrested in St. Louis

Wed 07 49 AM

Just days after her 90th birthday, Holocaust survivor Hedy Epstein was arrested Monday in St. Louis when she was part of a protest outside Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon’s office. Epstein was born in Germany and left in 1939 on a Kindertransport to England. Her parents died in Auschwitz. Epstein is a co-founder of the St. Louis Palestine Solidarity Committee and St. Louis branch of Jewish Voice for Peace. In 2011, she was part of the Gaza Freedom Flotilla and was a passenger on the U.S.-flagged ship, The Audacity of Hope. Over the years, she has made many solidarity trips to the West Bank. Epstein criticizes the police handling of protests in Ferguson. "It’s the same kind of violence that I’ve observed when I was in the Israeli-occupied Palestine," Epstein says. "I know what it feels like to be discriminated against, to be oppressed, and I can’t stand idly by when I see there are problems."

"They Are All Michael Brown": State Senator Defends Protesters Seeking Justice in Police Shooting

Wed 07 35 AM

During the protests in Ferguson, one of the key voices calling for justice is Missouri State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal. She has been in the streets facing tear gas, and on Twitter, where she was highly critical of Gov. Jay Nixon’s lack of action days after Michael Brown was killed by police and protests erupted. "The fact that [Gov. Nixon] still has not come to talk to the people who see themselves as Michael Brown at any given time is really a slap in their face," Chappelle-Nadal says. "He only comes around the minority community when it’s politically expedient."

"Not Acceptable in a Civilized Society": Pastor on Ferguson Police Targeting Traumatized Youth

Wed 07 28 AM

As we continue our live broadcast from Ferguson, Missouri, we speak with Michael McBride, pastor of The Way Christian Center in Berkeley, California. He is also national director of the Lifelines for Healing Communities Campaign, part of People Improving Communities through Organizing, or PICO, the largest faith-based network of community organizing in the country. McBride has been in Ferguson working with young people as a peacekeeper and supporting their acts of civil disobedience. He says the protesters are "practicing the legacy of civil rights and resistance" in the United States. "People wondering why folks are so outraged? Because we have children," McBride says. "What parent would not be outraged that their children are being killed by people who we pay with our tax dollars?"

Rubber Bullets, Tear Gas and Jail: Ferguson Police Crack Down on Journalists Covering Protests

Wed 07 10 AM

Protests over the fatal police shooting of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown have continued for a 10th night in Ferguson, Missouri. Protesters are calling for the arrest of Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson, who shot the unarmed teenager six times, including twice in the head. According to The New York Times, Attorney General Eric Holder and top Justice Department officials are weighing whether to open a broader civil rights investigation to look at Ferguson’s police practices at large. Meanwhile, the Committee to Protect Journalists has called on the Ferguson Police Department to stop harassing and detaining journalists. At least 11 journalists have been detained while covering the protests sparked by the shooting of Brown. We speak to Ryan Devereaux of The Intercept. On Monday night covering the demonstrations, he was shot by a rubber bullet, arrested and jailed overnight.

"Overpoliced & Underprotected": In Michael Brown Killing, Neglect of Black Communities Laid Bare

Tue 07 45 AM

As we continue to discuss the developments since the fatal shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by a white police officer, we turn to john a. powell, professor of law, African American studies and ethnic studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the director of the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society. "The black community tends be overpoliced and underprotected," powell says. "That’s a very serious problem."